The University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund supports students and employees on all four campuses in times of personal hardship.

This year when our campuses were mostly shut down and classes were shifted online due to the coronavirus, things were especially challenging for students who lost jobs or needed to find new housing.

But generous alumni and friends stepped up and helped with donations to the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund when they were needed most.

Financial assistance totaling $105,592 has been awarded to 214 students.

Here are some of their stories.

Kelsie, a UNMC Kearney student, lost all three of her jobs when her employers shuttered their businesses due to the pandemic. “What do I do now?” she wondered. “Working is how I pay for everything. My house, my bills, my health insurance, car insurance and school.” Kelsie’s father died during her freshman year of high school, and her mom is a single parent of three on one income. The money Kelsie received from the university crisis fund “made a huge difference” for her and her family.

Angela, a Ph.D. student at UNL, is disabled with a chronic illness and is raising a five-year-old son while caring for her partner, who has a traumatic brain injury and is battling brain cancer. Angela had to pause her mortgage and a loan payment and said she often feels at her wits’ end. She received assistance from the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund and used it to pay rent and buy healthy groceries. It gave her a breather, which she’s grateful for. “I’m just at that edge all the time,” she said, “and it affects my health.”

On UNO’s campus, Rhea lost her job at the campus recreation center when it was shut down. “It was a relief to be able to get groceries and pay off some utilities that were piling up,” she said, after receiving help from the university crisis fund. Rhea said, “I wasn’t expecting to get this fund, but I’m very, very grateful that I did … words can’t even describe how this fund has helped, to be honest.”

These are real students and real members of the University of Nebraska family, and their lives were improved thanks to generous individuals who know that even the smallest donation has made a difference and continues to do so.

Applications for relief from the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund continue to roll in. Please contribute if you’d like to join others in supporting the many students who still need help.

Thank you and best wishes for the health and safety of you and your loved ones.

Through the thoughtfulness of an old friend, a student scholarship fund honors the life of University of Nebraska alumnus and WWII veteran Robert K. Oswald of Aurora, Nebraska, who lost his life at age 23.

By Jolie Berrier

Both of my parents were of the “greatest generation.” My mom worked in a bomber plane in Nebraska during the war, and my dad was an Army Air Corps officer with the 442nd Troop Carrier Division, stationed in England and later in France and Germany.

In 2012 my elderly parents in California finally agreed to move from their house into assisted living. Mom was in hospice, and Dad’s memory was starting to falter. While moving furniture out of their home, my mother asked me to store and keep her father’s World War I footlocker. When I asked about the contents, she brushed my question aside and moved on to other issues. Eventually, the footlocker was put on a truck, contents and all, and shipped to my home in Washington state.

Approximately six months later I decided to open the chest and examine its treasures. Little did I realize that doing so would allow me to create this narrative.

Buried among the reams of sewing fabric were photos of a serviceman from World War II as well as letters, maps and photos of B-24s. Scanning the contents, I learned that an airman who died in the war was a friend of my mother’s from the University of Nebraska, and that my mom researched the story of his loss nearly 50 years later. His name was Robert K. Oswald.

In early 2013 I visited my ailing mother; although weak from a lung infection, she was still quite sharp. Quietly I asked, “So who was Bob Oswald?” She realized I’d found the items in the trunk and promptly hung her head in a sheepish sort of way. My mom looked up and said, “Oh Bob. Bob could light up a room when he walked into it.”

She told me that Bob Oswald was a navigator on a B-24 that crashed in 1945 in Southeast Asia only a few months before the end of the war. One of the letters she received from her research indicated that Bob decided at the last minute to fly an extra mission (not with his normal crew), so that he could get home sooner to be with his sweetheart. I think I asked mom if she was Bob’s sweetheart. “No, but I wish I had been,” she replied wistfully.

I asked no more questions knowing my mom was very tired and ill and that I’d uncovered a private sadness in her past. This was the only opportunity I had to talk to my mother about Bob; a week later, she passed away.

By late 2015 my unconscious 94-year-old dad was in hospice, so I was back in California sorting through paperwork and making decisions about my parents’ belongings and his care. Going through his file cabinet, I discovered a red folio with a big “N” on it. I was about to put it in the discard pile but something compelled me to open it. Inside it was a recent letter addressed to my mom from a graduate student at the University of Nebraska thanking her for the Robert K. Oswald Memorial Endowment Scholarship.

In my weary state, I suddenly remembered the old footlocker and its contents. My mother never told me about the scholarship, and the thought crossed my mind that in my mother’s search for answers to Bob’s passing, she took her sorrow and loss and used it for a good cause. And by doing so, she created a legacy for herself and for the memory of Robert K. Oswald. I don’t know whether my dad ever knew of Bob Oswald or the scholarship that my mother created in his name; my dad passed away within the week of my finding the red folio.

Over the past few years, I’ve thoroughly examined the contents of the footlocker. I learned that my mother first began researching the loss of Bob Oswald in the late 1980s by writing to Tommy Thompson, then president of the Flying Circus Association. He helped contact others who provided the names and addresses of Bob’s original flight crew.

My mother apparently wrote to some of them. Beautiful letters received from Bob Oswald’s fellow crew members gave her insight into why Bob took that last and fateful mission. Her research included letters to and from the State Department and eventually led her to a grave marker in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky, where Bob Oswald was buried with other crew members who died alongside him. Apparently my mother went to Kentucky to put a flag on his grave, as evident by a photo of Bob’s gravestone among her papers.

Robert K. Oswald was a Second Lieutenant with the 380th Bombardment Group, 5th Air Force Division. On June 12, 1945, he was reported missing in action over Saigon French Indochina after the B-24 he was navigating was shot down. In December 1945, he was reported dead and in April 1946, his parents in Aurora, Nebraska, received his posthumous Purple Heart. There is a plaque honoring his memory in Aurora in addition to the one where he is buried in Louisville, Kentucky. Bob was 23 years old upon his death.

Without the initial help my mother received in connecting Bob’s former crew members to her 25 years ago, there would probably be little record of Bob’s life and passing. And had it not been for these few letters, photographs and clues that my mother saved in her father’s footlocker, I would never have known or been able to share this remarkable story. It’s the story of Robert K. Oswald’s sacrifice to our country and the lifelong regret over his loss that inspired my mother to learn more about him and honor him with a generously endowed scholarship at their alma mater – more than 50 years after he died.

This scholarship has never had a story behind it until now. I hope that every recipient of the Robert K. Oswald Memorial Endowed Scholarship at the University of Nebraska will now hear this story and give thanks to Bob for his service and to my mother for her admiration of Bob and her desire to honor him in this way.

Each morning, Angela, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln student, wakes up at 4:30 a.m. to care for her partner, who recently resumed full-time work after he was laid off from his plumbing job due to COVID-19. She helps get him ready for work and cancer treatment. Then she homeschools her son, teaches an online class for UNL and tries to find some time in the day to work on her doctoral dissertation proposal.

Angela has applied for emergency assistance wherever she can, and her partner has applied for unemployment insurance, but it has not come through yet. In the interim, she has had to pause her mortgage and a loan payment and says she often feels at her wits’ end.

“I’m just at that edge all the time,” she said. “And it affects my health.”

Angela recently received assistance from the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund, which she said she used to pay rent and buy healthy groceries. It gave her a breather, for which she is grateful.

The University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund was established last year to enable the university to provide financial help to students and employees impacted by record flooding across the state.

This year, it has served as a lifeline to those who have suddenly found themselves facing financial hardship due to COVID-19.

To date, nearly 215 individuals, such as Angela, have received assistance to help pay for food and toiletries, or mounting bills.

You can help make critical support available to members of the NU family by providing immediate support to those in need. Here’s how.

Contributors provided nearly $1,500 to help University of Nebraska–Lincoln students and the Husker Pantry during the annual Give to Lincoln Day on May 28, 2020.

Give to Lincoln Day came at an especially important time, as the university supports those affected by the coronavirus, including food-insecure students on campus now and who will be returning to campus this fall.

Due to the unprecedented challenges students are facing, the Husker Pantry is partnering with campus dining services to provide meal tickets to students who may not otherwise be able to afford every meal. With support from alumni and friends, the Husker Pantry has been able to help many students through the meal ticket program.

“You have no idea how elated I was when I picked up food today. Thank you all for everything you do,” said a UNL student who recently used the services of the Husker Pantry and wrote to thank them.

Gifts may be made any time to help the Husker Pantry.

The Husker Pantry will also benefit from matching challenge funds made possible during the giving event by the Lincoln Community Foundation, event sponsor West Gate Bank and many other supporting organizations and donors.

Just hours before the May 28 online giving event ended, the Lincoln Journal Star reported that it was a record year for the annual event, with more than $6.6 million raised in support of nearly 450 local charities. Now in its ninth year, the event surpassed last year’s record of $5.5 million in donations.

The Lincoln Community Foundation coordinates Give to Lincoln Day in partnership with local nonprofit organizations. The purpose of Give to Lincoln Day is to promote philanthropy in Lincoln and Lancaster County.

To learn about ways to help students and others at the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine who may be especially affected by the current health pandemic, go to nufoundation.org/covid19.


Today’s Give to Lincoln Day is opportunity to help food-insecure Huskers

May 28, 2020

Give to Lincoln Day on May 28 is a giving day event that encourages people to contribute to Lincoln and Lancaster County nonprofit organizations.

This year, Give to Lincoln Day comes at an especially important time as the university supports those affected by COVID-19, including food-insecure students on campus now and who will be returning this fall.

Due to the unprecedented challenges students are facing, the Husker Pantry is partnering with campus dining services to provide meal tickets to students who may not otherwise be able to afford every meal. With support from alumni and friends, the Husker Pantry has been able to help many students through the meal ticket allotment program, but it needs your help now more than ever to benefit even more students.

Help the Husker Pantry during Give to Lincoln Day at givetolincoln.com/nonprofits/university-of-nebraska-foundation.

By coming together and contributing any amount, we show our students, “We’ll all stick together in all kinds of weather for dear old Nebraska U.”

Every contribution during this event also increases the opportunity for the Husker Pantry to receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. To qualify, make a gift by the end of day on May 28.

Another top priority for the University of Nebraska is support for the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund. This fund enables the university to help students and employees on each campus who are facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, personal hardships, and now adversities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

About Give to Lincoln Day 2020

The Lincoln Community Foundation coordinates Give to Lincoln Day in partnership with local nonprofit organizations. The purpose of Give to Lincoln Day is to promote philanthropy in Lincoln and Lancaster County.

Every donation makes a bigger impact on Give to Lincoln Day because nonprofits also get a proportional share of a $500,000 match fund made possible by LCF and generous sponsors.

Contributors to the annual Omaha Gives event gave more than $38,000 in gifts to support causes at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine.

Omaha Gives, the community’s only annual 24-hour charitable challenge, was held on May 20 and is organized by the Omaha Community Foundation to raise support for nonprofits.

The University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine partnered with the University of Nebraska Foundation to promote giving day support for causes tied to helping people who may be adversely affected by COVID-19.

University of Nebraska at Omaha

The UNO Maverick Food Pantry received more than $3,700 in support for its mission to help food-insecure students on campus and to provide other personal necessities to students that they may not be able to afford. The pantry provides its services to students who attend UNO or UNMC. Like most university food pantries, the Mav Pantry has seen an increase in the need for its services during the pandemic.

Six other UNO organizations also participated independently in Omaha Gives, including UNO Students Against Hunger, Glacier Creek Preserve and KVNO 90.7 FM. Together, the six organizations received $24,800 in gifts.

University of Nebraska Medical Center

UNMC and its Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) received gifts of nearly $6,300. SIM-NE is a mobile training system that provides statewide training for the providers of rural emergency medical services and health professionals in hospitals — normally using four, 44-foot-long, customized trucks. Since the coronavirus outbreak, it has shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing education and training. Since the pandemic, it has trained more than 1,600 health care providers on topics related to COVID-19.

Nebraska Medicine

Nebraska Medicine received more than $3,300 for support of its Employee Emergency Assistance Fund. Established in 2018 at the University of Nebraska Foundation, the fund is used to support employees and their families who may be affected in some way by a critical or urgent situation. With the adverse challenges caused by COVID-19, the fund is of special importance now.


Omaha Gives May 20 comes at important time for our Omaha organizations

May 10, 2020

Omaha Gives, the community’s only annual 24-hour charitable challenge, is set for May 20, 2020. The giving begins at midnight, and hourly drawings and prizes make donations go further.

Causes at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine stand to benefit from support during this Omaha event.

Omaha Gives comes at an especially critical time now as our university and health care network support those adversely affected by COVID-19 and provide important information and resources across the state about the disease.

Support the Maverick Food Pantry

As our university community continues to navigate the challenges presented by COVID-19, the UNO Maverick Food remains steadfast in its commitment to support the dietary and personal hygiene needs of students, faculty and staff at both UNO and UNMC.

Unprecedented demand for food and hygiene resources in our community requires an unprecedented response. If you are able, please consider a gift to support food-insecure members of the UNO and UNMC community during this uncertain time.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that the Maverick Food Pantry will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/uno.

UNO also shares other opportunities to help campus programs here.

Support Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE)

Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) is a mobile training system that provides free statewide training for providers of rural emergency medical services and health professionals in hospitals — normally using its four, 44-foot-long customized trucks.

Since the coronavirus outbreak, it has shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing critical educational training across the state. SIM-NE recently held three virtual training events attended by more than 1,600 health care providers. It held COVID-19 training related to patient surge preparation, leadership and the rapidly changing rural health care environment.

Since the program’s launch in 2017, SIM-NE mobile units have provided more than 20,000 hours of simulation training for nearly 7,300 emergency medical providers in most Nebraska counties.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that SIM-NE will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/unmc.

Support the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund

During Omaha Gives, contributions to help the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund are also needed.

The Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund is used to supplement housing when a front-line worker needs to shelter away from family at high risk for COVID-19. It also provides meals, emergency childcare and other personal care to ease the current stress on our medical caregivers.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that the assistance fund will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/nebraskamedicine.

University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund

Another top priority for the University of Nebraska is support for the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund. This fund enables the university to help students and employees on each campus who are facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, personal hardships, and now adversities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

About Omaha Gives

Omaha Gives! is a 24-hour online fundraising event organized by the Omaha Community Foundation to raise support for nonprofits in Douglas, Sarpy and Pottawattamie Counties.

It is a community-wide event to showcase the area’s spirit of giving, raise awareness about local nonprofits and celebrate the collective effort it takes to make this community great.

Since 2013, this community give-together has raised $49 million for more than 1,000 nonprofits. The event is based online at omahagives.org.

We are in uncharted territory.

A national emergency declaration in response to a pandemic virus is new to all of us, and we want to be both sensitive and responsive to the unique situation of every single student, every alumnus and every friend of the University of Nebraska.

With economic uncertainty a reality for many, we ask for financial support with prudence. At the same time, some in our university family have reached out to ask how they can help, and some student support organizations have reached out to seek assistance.

We’ve highlighted some funds here that allow you to help our students, patients and communities during this public health crisis.

Whether you’re able to give at this time or not, we extend our wishes for your health and safety.

Sincerely,

Walter “Ted” Carter Jr.
President, University of Nebraska

Ronnie D. Green, Ph.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Jeffrey P. Gold, M.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska Medical Center and University of Nebraska at Omaha

Douglas Kristensen, J.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Brian F. Hastings
President and CEO, University of Nebraska Foundation

Grant of $1.5 million will provide emergency cardiac care equipment, emergency medical training

Providing emergency cardiac care equipment to Nebraska hospitals in response to COVID-19 and providing training to emergency health care workers is the focus of a $1.5 million grant to the University of Nebraska Medical Center from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

UNMC’s Interprofessional Experiential Center for Enduring Learning (iEXCEL) and Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) partnered with the University of Nebraska Foundation to secure the grant.

With this grant, iEXCEL and SIM-NE will be able to oversee the purchase of 100 mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) devices and the distribution of them to more than 30 health care organizations across Nebraska and in part of western Iowa.

iEXCEL also received two devices for use for training of students, residents, faculty and health care providers. The funding also provides support for the SIM-NE program to provide virtual training events for EMS agencies and critical access hospitals on the best practices in responding to medical situations involving COVID-19.

“This gift will help save lives across the state of Nebraska,” said UNMC Chancellor Jeffrey P. Gold, M.D. “Disseminating these devices throughout the state, especially at a time when front-line responders are under immense pressure due to COVID-19 concerns, will provide an immediate, positive impact in times of dire medical crisis. We are grateful to the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust for this gift.”

According to the Stryker Corporation, manufacturer of the LUCAS chest compression system, this device provides benefits to both the person experiencing the cardiac arrest and the resuscitation team by delivering high-performance, continuous chest compressions with less strain, micromanagement and risk for caregivers.

“These devices are vital, because we don’t want front-line health care workers to choose between trying to save a patient or risking exposure to themselves and others to the coronavirus,” said Walter Panzirer, a trustee for the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “LUCAS has been a proven, effective tool in saving lives during cardiac arrest, and having more of them available during this pandemic will save even more lives, including those of the doctors, nurses and other health care workers.”

The Helmsley Charitable Trust awarded more than $4.7 million to organizations in five states to provide 367 LUCAS mechanical CPR devices to hospitals. It partnered with medical facilities in Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming to ensure the devices were in place during the pandemic and that they remain in use after the pandemic as part of a center’s cardiac care system.

“The great support from the Helmsley Charitable Trust helps so many hospitals and the ability of their medical staff to save lives, so this is big,” said Doug Dekker, SIM-NE program manager.

Ben Stobbe, assistant vice chancellor of clinical simulation for iEXCEL, said, “Because of this generosity and partnership, UNMC purchased and will deliver LUCAS cardiac devices into the hands of the medical staff at hospitals in a matter of weeks rather than months.”

SIM-NE provides mobile statewide training services using four, 44-foot-long, customized trucks for the instruction of rural EMS providers and health professionals in hospitals. Since the coronavirus outbreak, it’s shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing critical educational training.

SIM-NE was initially funded with a $5.5 million grant from the Helmsley Charitable Trust as well as other private contributions to the University of Nebraska Foundation.

 

Serving the state

Hospitals that received LUCAS mechanical CPR devices included:

On Jan. 1, Walter “Ted” Carter became the eighth president of the University of Nebraska. He came to Nebraska from the U.S. Naval Academy his alma mater where, as superintendent, he oversaw record graduation rates, growth in student diversity and successful philanthropic partnerships. Carter previously served as president of the U.S. Naval War College.

Carter and his wife, Lynda, are settling into their new lives as Nebraskans. He recently spoke about his early impressions of the University of Nebraska, his goals for the future and the unexpected challenge of guiding the university community through the COVID-19 pandemic.

You’ve had an opportunity to spend time on the University of Nebraska’s campuses and meet many of the students, faculty and staff. What are your initial observations?

I said on Day 1 that the University of Nebraska presidency was one of the best jobs in American higher education. Today I’m even more convinced of that.

Something special is happening here. I see it in our 51,000 students, the next generation of entrepreneurs, farmers and ranchers, nurses and doctors, teachers, scientists and artists. I see it in our amazing faculty and staff, who are leading the world in feeding a hungry population, fighting infectious disease and keeping our men and women in uniform safe. I see it in the ambitious plans for growth in UNL’s engineering college that will place us in elite company, and in the new STEM education building at UNK that’s going to be a game-changer for rural Nebraska’s workforce.

And I see it in the partnerships that have extended the reach and impact of the university far beyond what any of us could accomplish alone. Our visionary and generous philanthropic partners, of course, are at the top of that list. Donors are making it possible for us to achieve our goal to make Nebraska the best place in the nation to be a baby, for example. They built our flagship campus’ business college and helped stand up world-leading facilities dedicated to care and infectious disease. And they have made the promise of a college education a reality for countless young people the greatest gift of all. To say that we are grateful for our donors is an understatement. They, along with our public partners and many others, have made the University of Nebraska what it is today.

The coronavirus is having a tremendous impact. Speak about the university’s response to the pandemic. What’s it like to be president at a time of so much uncertainty?

We’re thinking 24 hours a day, seven days a week about all those affected by this situation, starting with our students, faculty and staff. The resilience and dedication that I have seen from our community through this period has been inspiring. I’m seeing faculty think creatively about how to continue to deliver the highest-quality education in new and different ways. I’m seeing staff ask every possible question to make sure students are cared for. And, of course, I’m seeing UNMC featured on a daily basis in the national headlines for our leadership in battling infectious disease. I am so proud to call myself a Nebraskan. This is a challenging time for us as for people around the world but I believe our strengths as a student-focused university will see us through.

You’ve been working hard on a five-year strategic plan for the university system. What can you share at this time?

We’ve necessarily hit the pause button on some of our planning given the current circumstances. But my enthusiasm about our future hasn’t changed. I think that when we do roll out our plan, it’s going to get people across the country to sit up and say, “Wow. Did you see what the University of Nebraska is doing?”

UNO was just selected by the Department of Homeland Security after a highly competitive process to lead a national counterterrorism research center. We want to see more of this is the kind of landmark achievement.

I’m blessed to be surrounded by so many people who care deeply about their university and share in the belief that we can be the preeminent higher education system in the country. Even as we navigate these uncertain times, I know I’m right where I’m supposed to be. Together, we are going to chart a strong future for our university.

The emergency hand sanitizer project at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in partnership with the Nebraska ethanol industry and other corporate partners is asking the public for support to help keep its important production going.

Production of an ethanol-based hand sanitizer at the university began in April in response to a critically short supply of sanitizer across much of Nebraska as a result of the health pandemic caused by COVID-19. The hand sanitizer is provided at no cost to hospitals, nursing homes, medical first responders, doctors’ offices, other health care providers and critical small businesses in Nebraska and nearby areas.

In partnership with the University of Nebraska Foundation, the university started a public crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/handsanitizer so anyone can contribute and help continue the vital project.

“With the start of this crowdfunding effort, we’re hoping even more people will step up to help so we can continue the needed production and protect Nebraska’s first responders, health care providers and others,” said Terry Howell Jr., executive director of the UNL Food Processing Center.

As demand rose this year for hand sanitizer, prices increased, and its availability started drying up, concerning health care organizations, municipalities and companies.

“As the university and our industry partners learned about the alarming shortage of hand sanitizer in the state, we knew a system and collaboration must be formed with the ethanol industry and others to help,” said Hunter Flodman, assistant professor of practice in chemical and biomolecular engineering at UNL.

Through the collaboration and support from Nebraska companies, more than 60,000 gallons of hand sanitizer have been produced and distributed to more than 500 organizations and facilities across Nebraska, including to frontline health care providers and first responders.

The Nebraska ethanol industry has been donating its product, which is processed with other ingredients to make the hand sanitizer. Green Plains donated more than 95% of the ethanol used.

The idea to produce hand sanitizer at the university’s Food Processing Center on Nebraska Innovation Campus began in mid-March. The university and the Nebraska Ethanol Board worked with the federal Food and Drug Administration so that local ethanol could be made into hand sanitizer. Full production began in April.

Individuals and companies that want more information about the fundraising initiative and how to help can contact Justin Carlson at the University of Nebraska Foundation at 402-458-1196.

Health care organizations and other essential service organizations and companies have priority for ordering the hand sanitizer. Ordering and information are available at handsanitizer.unl.edu.

The following is a list of some of the organizations that have received hand sanitizer:

Annie Jeffrey Hospital
Aurora Cooperative
Boone County Hospital
Bryan Health
Bubbles and Blocks
Cambridge and McCook Hospital District
CHI Health St. Elizabeth
City of Columbus
City of Gothenberg
City of Lincoln
City of Platte Valley
City of Sidney
Columbus Community College
Columbus Police Department
Complete Children’s Health
Crete Area Medical Center
Crete Police Department
Cumming County Nursing Homes and Hospitals
Farmers Cooperative
Douglas County
Fillmore County Hospital
Food Allergy Research and Resource Program
Gage Area Public Health Department
Good Samaritan Hospital
Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office
LES
Nance County
Nebraska Game and Parks
Nebraska National Guard
Nebraska Public Power District
Norton County Hospital
Renewable Fuels Association  (hospital distribution)
Rural Electric Association
Saline County Post Office
Saline County Sheriff’s Department
State of Nebraska
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
UNL Police Department
University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine
West Central Research and Extension Center
Western Nebraska Community College

The current health pandemic creates unprecedented needs for the people and organizations we care about, including the University of Nebraska.

Giving Tuesday Now (#GivingTuesdayNow) is a new global day of giving and unity on May 5, 2020, in emergency response to the COVID-19 virus. Because of the urgency, it takes place in advance of the traditional Giving Tuesday on Dec. 1.

Those who wish to support causes related to the University of Nebraska on May 5 or around that day have an opportunity to make a difference. Here are some important options to consider:

University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund — Helping to support students and employees on all four campuses of the NU system who are now facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, including the current pandemic, is why support of the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund is needed.

Husker Pantry — Meeting the needs of students who face food insecurity is the role of the Husker Pantry at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln which has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/huskerpantry with a goal to raise $5,000. Meeting the goal means the pantry can partner with campus dining services to provide 3,200 meals to students in need.

Big Blue Cupboard — Meeting the needs of students who face food insecurity is the role of the Big Blue Cupboard at the University of Nebraska at Kearney which has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/bigbluecupboard with a goal to raise $5,000 to help students in need. Directed to help in various ways, gifts provide pantry staples, fresh produce, hygiene and toiletry products, and a needed refrigerator.

Maverick Pantry — Continuing to provide its services to food-insecure individuals is the reason the Maverick Food Pantry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/unomavfoodpantry with the goal to raise $5,000. Meeting the goal will enable it to help students through the end of the year, which often represents difficult months for some students.

UNMC Global Center for Health Security — The Global Center for Health Security, led by the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine, represents a tradition of biopreparedness, including the internationally acclaimed Nebraska Biocontainment Unit team. A gift supports the center’s rapid response abilities, including training, education, research and clinical expertise for infectious diseases.

Nebraska Medicine — Support for patient and employee safety through personal protective equipment is the reason Nebraska Medicine has a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/nemedppe. Gifts of various levels can help make certain health care professionals always have face masks, infectious disease supplies, face shields and intubation shields.

Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund — Helping current employees who face financial hardship resulting from emergency or crisis situations, such as the current health pandemic, is why support for the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund is important now.

Those who are interested in supporting the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine in other ways can explore the options at nufoundation.org/covid19.