Contributors provided nearly $1,500 to help University of Nebraska–Lincoln students and the Husker Pantry during the annual Give to Lincoln Day on May 28, 2020.

Give to Lincoln Day came at an especially important time, as the university supports those affected by the coronavirus, including food-insecure students on campus now and who will be returning to campus this fall.

Due to the unprecedented challenges students are facing, the Husker Pantry is partnering with campus dining services to provide meal tickets to students who may not otherwise be able to afford every meal. With support from alumni and friends, the Husker Pantry has been able to help many students through the meal ticket program.

“You have no idea how elated I was when I picked up food today. Thank you all for everything you do,” said a UNL student who recently used the services of the Husker Pantry and wrote to thank them.

Gifts may be made any time to help the Husker Pantry.

The Husker Pantry will also benefit from matching challenge funds made possible during the giving event by the Lincoln Community Foundation, event sponsor West Gate Bank and many other supporting organizations and donors.

Just hours before the May 28 online giving event ended, the Lincoln Journal Star reported that it was a record year for the annual event, with more than $6.6 million raised in support of nearly 450 local charities. Now in its ninth year, the event surpassed last year’s record of $5.5 million in donations.

The Lincoln Community Foundation coordinates Give to Lincoln Day in partnership with local nonprofit organizations. The purpose of Give to Lincoln Day is to promote philanthropy in Lincoln and Lancaster County.

To learn about ways to help students and others at the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine who may be especially affected by the current health pandemic, go to nufoundation.org/covid19.


Today’s Give to Lincoln Day is opportunity to help food-insecure Huskers

May 28, 2020

Give to Lincoln Day on May 28 is a giving day event that encourages people to contribute to Lincoln and Lancaster County nonprofit organizations.

This year, Give to Lincoln Day comes at an especially important time as the university supports those affected by COVID-19, including food-insecure students on campus now and who will be returning this fall.

Due to the unprecedented challenges students are facing, the Husker Pantry is partnering with campus dining services to provide meal tickets to students who may not otherwise be able to afford every meal. With support from alumni and friends, the Husker Pantry has been able to help many students through the meal ticket allotment program, but it needs your help now more than ever to benefit even more students.

Help the Husker Pantry during Give to Lincoln Day at givetolincoln.com/nonprofits/university-of-nebraska-foundation.

By coming together and contributing any amount, we show our students, “We’ll all stick together in all kinds of weather for dear old Nebraska U.”

Every contribution during this event also increases the opportunity for the Husker Pantry to receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. To qualify, make a gift by the end of day on May 28.

Another top priority for the University of Nebraska is support for the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund. This fund enables the university to help students and employees on each campus who are facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, personal hardships, and now adversities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

About Give to Lincoln Day 2020

The Lincoln Community Foundation coordinates Give to Lincoln Day in partnership with local nonprofit organizations. The purpose of Give to Lincoln Day is to promote philanthropy in Lincoln and Lancaster County.

Every donation makes a bigger impact on Give to Lincoln Day because nonprofits also get a proportional share of a $500,000 match fund made possible by LCF and generous sponsors.

Contributors to the annual Omaha Gives event gave more than $38,000 in gifts to support causes at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine.

Omaha Gives, the community’s only annual 24-hour charitable challenge, was held on May 20 and is organized by the Omaha Community Foundation to raise support for nonprofits.

The University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine partnered with the University of Nebraska Foundation to promote giving day support for causes tied to helping people who may be adversely affected by COVID-19.

University of Nebraska at Omaha

The UNO Maverick Food Pantry received more than $3,700 in support for its mission to help food-insecure students on campus and to provide other personal necessities to students that they may not be able to afford. The pantry provides its services to students who attend UNO or UNMC. Like most university food pantries, the Mav Pantry has seen an increase in the need for its services during the pandemic.

Six other UNO organizations also participated independently in Omaha Gives, including UNO Students Against Hunger, Glacier Creek Preserve and KVNO 90.7 FM. Together, the six organizations received $24,800 in gifts.

University of Nebraska Medical Center

UNMC and its Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) received gifts of nearly $6,300. SIM-NE is a mobile training system that provides statewide training for the providers of rural emergency medical services and health professionals in hospitals — normally using four, 44-foot-long, customized trucks. Since the coronavirus outbreak, it has shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing education and training. Since the pandemic, it has trained more than 1,600 health care providers on topics related to COVID-19.

Nebraska Medicine

Nebraska Medicine received more than $3,300 for support of its Employee Emergency Assistance Fund. Established in 2018 at the University of Nebraska Foundation, the fund is used to support employees and their families who may be affected in some way by a critical or urgent situation. With the adverse challenges caused by COVID-19, the fund is of special importance now.


Omaha Gives May 20 comes at important time for our Omaha organizations

May 10, 2020

Omaha Gives, the community’s only annual 24-hour charitable challenge, is set for May 20, 2020. The giving begins at midnight, and hourly drawings and prizes make donations go further.

Causes at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine stand to benefit from support during this Omaha event.

Omaha Gives comes at an especially critical time now as our university and health care network support those adversely affected by COVID-19 and provide important information and resources across the state about the disease.

Support the Maverick Food Pantry

As our university community continues to navigate the challenges presented by COVID-19, the UNO Maverick Food remains steadfast in its commitment to support the dietary and personal hygiene needs of students, faculty and staff at both UNO and UNMC.

Unprecedented demand for food and hygiene resources in our community requires an unprecedented response. If you are able, please consider a gift to support food-insecure members of the UNO and UNMC community during this uncertain time.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that the Maverick Food Pantry will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/uno.

UNO also shares other opportunities to help campus programs here.

Support Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE)

Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) is a mobile training system that provides free statewide training for providers of rural emergency medical services and health professionals in hospitals — normally using its four, 44-foot-long customized trucks.

Since the coronavirus outbreak, it has shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing critical educational training across the state. SIM-NE recently held three virtual training events attended by more than 1,600 health care providers. It held COVID-19 training related to patient surge preparation, leadership and the rapidly changing rural health care environment.

Since the program’s launch in 2017, SIM-NE mobile units have provided more than 20,000 hours of simulation training for nearly 7,300 emergency medical providers in most Nebraska counties.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that SIM-NE will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/unmc.

Support the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund

During Omaha Gives, contributions to help the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund are also needed.

The Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund is used to supplement housing when a front-line worker needs to shelter away from family at high risk for COVID-19. It also provides meals, emergency childcare and other personal care to ease the current stress on our medical caregivers.

Every gift made during Omaha Gives increases the chances that the assistance fund will also receive matching dollars made available by the event’s sponsors and benefactors. Gifts may be made on May 20 or scheduled online now.

Contribute at omahagives.org/nebraskamedicine.

University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund

Another top priority for the University of Nebraska is support for the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund. This fund enables the university to help students and employees on each campus who are facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, personal hardships, and now adversities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

About Omaha Gives

Omaha Gives! is a 24-hour online fundraising event organized by the Omaha Community Foundation to raise support for nonprofits in Douglas, Sarpy and Pottawattamie Counties.

It is a community-wide event to showcase the area’s spirit of giving, raise awareness about local nonprofits and celebrate the collective effort it takes to make this community great.

Since 2013, this community give-together has raised $49 million for more than 1,000 nonprofits. The event is based online at omahagives.org.

We are in uncharted territory.

A national emergency declaration in response to a pandemic virus is new to all of us, and we want to be both sensitive and responsive to the unique situation of every single student, every alumnus and every friend of the University of Nebraska.

With economic uncertainty a reality for many, we ask for financial support with prudence. At the same time, some in our university family have reached out to ask how they can help, and some student support organizations have reached out to seek assistance.

We’ve highlighted some funds here that allow you to help our students, patients and communities during this public health crisis.

Whether you’re able to give at this time or not, we extend our wishes for your health and safety.

Sincerely,

Walter “Ted” Carter Jr.
President, University of Nebraska

Ronnie D. Green, Ph.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Jeffrey P. Gold, M.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska Medical Center and University of Nebraska at Omaha

Douglas Kristensen, J.D.
Chancellor, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Brian F. Hastings
President and CEO, University of Nebraska Foundation

Grant of $1.5 million will provide emergency cardiac care equipment, emergency medical training

Providing emergency cardiac care equipment to Nebraska hospitals in response to COVID-19 and providing training to emergency health care workers is the focus of a $1.5 million grant to the University of Nebraska Medical Center from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

UNMC’s Interprofessional Experiential Center for Enduring Learning (iEXCEL) and Simulation in Motion-Nebraska (SIM-NE) partnered with the University of Nebraska Foundation to secure the grant.

With this grant, iEXCEL and SIM-NE will be able to oversee the purchase of 100 mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) devices and the distribution of them to more than 30 health care organizations across Nebraska and in part of western Iowa.

iEXCEL also received two devices for use for training of students, residents, faculty and health care providers. The funding also provides support for the SIM-NE program to provide virtual training events for EMS agencies and critical access hospitals on the best practices in responding to medical situations involving COVID-19.

“This gift will help save lives across the state of Nebraska,” said UNMC Chancellor Jeffrey P. Gold, M.D. “Disseminating these devices throughout the state, especially at a time when front-line responders are under immense pressure due to COVID-19 concerns, will provide an immediate, positive impact in times of dire medical crisis. We are grateful to the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust for this gift.”

According to the Stryker Corporation, manufacturer of the LUCAS chest compression system, this device provides benefits to both the person experiencing the cardiac arrest and the resuscitation team by delivering high-performance, continuous chest compressions with less strain, micromanagement and risk for caregivers.

“These devices are vital, because we don’t want front-line health care workers to choose between trying to save a patient or risking exposure to themselves and others to the coronavirus,” said Walter Panzirer, a trustee for the Helmsley Charitable Trust. “LUCAS has been a proven, effective tool in saving lives during cardiac arrest, and having more of them available during this pandemic will save even more lives, including those of the doctors, nurses and other health care workers.”

The Helmsley Charitable Trust awarded more than $4.7 million to organizations in five states to provide 367 LUCAS mechanical CPR devices to hospitals. It partnered with medical facilities in Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming to ensure the devices were in place during the pandemic and that they remain in use after the pandemic as part of a center’s cardiac care system.

“The great support from the Helmsley Charitable Trust helps so many hospitals and the ability of their medical staff to save lives, so this is big,” said Doug Dekker, SIM-NE program manager.

Ben Stobbe, assistant vice chancellor of clinical simulation for iEXCEL, said, “Because of this generosity and partnership, UNMC purchased and will deliver LUCAS cardiac devices into the hands of the medical staff at hospitals in a matter of weeks rather than months.”

SIM-NE provides mobile statewide training services using four, 44-foot-long, customized trucks for the instruction of rural EMS providers and health professionals in hospitals. Since the coronavirus outbreak, it’s shifted its training to online and video sessions to protect its instructors and trainees while still providing critical educational training.

SIM-NE was initially funded with a $5.5 million grant from the Helmsley Charitable Trust as well as other private contributions to the University of Nebraska Foundation.

 

Serving the state

Hospitals that received LUCAS mechanical CPR devices included:

The emergency hand sanitizer project at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in partnership with the Nebraska ethanol industry and other corporate partners is asking the public for support to help keep its important production going.

Production of an ethanol-based hand sanitizer at the university began in April in response to a critically short supply of sanitizer across much of Nebraska as a result of the health pandemic caused by COVID-19. The hand sanitizer is provided at no cost to hospitals, nursing homes, medical first responders, doctors’ offices, other health care providers and critical small businesses in Nebraska and nearby areas.

In partnership with the University of Nebraska Foundation, the university started a public crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/handsanitizer so anyone can contribute and help continue the vital project.

“With the start of this crowdfunding effort, we’re hoping even more people will step up to help so we can continue the needed production and protect Nebraska’s first responders, health care providers and others,” said Terry Howell Jr., executive director of the UNL Food Processing Center.

As demand rose this year for hand sanitizer, prices increased, and its availability started drying up, concerning health care organizations, municipalities and companies.

“As the university and our industry partners learned about the alarming shortage of hand sanitizer in the state, we knew a system and collaboration must be formed with the ethanol industry and others to help,” said Hunter Flodman, assistant professor of practice in chemical and biomolecular engineering at UNL.

Through the collaboration and support from Nebraska companies, more than 60,000 gallons of hand sanitizer have been produced and distributed to more than 500 organizations and facilities across Nebraska, including to frontline health care providers and first responders.

The Nebraska ethanol industry has been donating its product, which is processed with other ingredients to make the hand sanitizer. Green Plains donated more than 95% of the ethanol used.

The idea to produce hand sanitizer at the university’s Food Processing Center on Nebraska Innovation Campus began in mid-March. The university and the Nebraska Ethanol Board worked with the federal Food and Drug Administration so that local ethanol could be made into hand sanitizer. Full production began in April.

Individuals and companies that want more information about the fundraising initiative and how to help can contact Justin Carlson at the University of Nebraska Foundation at 402-458-1196.

Health care organizations and other essential service organizations and companies have priority for ordering the hand sanitizer. Ordering and information are available at handsanitizer.unl.edu.

The following is a list of some of the organizations that have received hand sanitizer:

Annie Jeffrey Hospital
Aurora Cooperative
Boone County Hospital
Bryan Health
Bubbles and Blocks
Cambridge and McCook Hospital District
CHI Health St. Elizabeth
City of Columbus
City of Gothenberg
City of Lincoln
City of Platte Valley
City of Sidney
Columbus Community College
Columbus Police Department
Complete Children’s Health
Crete Area Medical Center
Crete Police Department
Cumming County Nursing Homes and Hospitals
Farmers Cooperative
Douglas County
Fillmore County Hospital
Food Allergy Research and Resource Program
Gage Area Public Health Department
Good Samaritan Hospital
Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office
LES
Nance County
Nebraska Game and Parks
Nebraska National Guard
Nebraska Public Power District
Norton County Hospital
Renewable Fuels Association  (hospital distribution)
Rural Electric Association
Saline County Post Office
Saline County Sheriff’s Department
State of Nebraska
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
UNL Police Department
University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine
West Central Research and Extension Center
Western Nebraska Community College

The current health pandemic creates unprecedented needs for the people and organizations we care about, including the University of Nebraska.

Giving Tuesday Now (#GivingTuesdayNow) is a new global day of giving and unity on May 5, 2020, in emergency response to the COVID-19 virus. Because of the urgency, it takes place in advance of the traditional Giving Tuesday on Dec. 1.

Those who wish to support causes related to the University of Nebraska on May 5 or around that day have an opportunity to make a difference. Here are some important options to consider:

University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund — Helping to support students and employees on all four campuses of the NU system who are now facing sudden financial hardship due to crisis situations, including the current pandemic, is why support of the University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund is needed.

Husker Pantry — Meeting the needs of students who face food insecurity is the role of the Husker Pantry at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln which has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/huskerpantry with a goal to raise $5,000. Meeting the goal means the pantry can partner with campus dining services to provide 3,200 meals to students in need.

Big Blue Cupboard — Meeting the needs of students who face food insecurity is the role of the Big Blue Cupboard at the University of Nebraska at Kearney which has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/bigbluecupboard with a goal to raise $5,000 to help students in need. Directed to help in various ways, gifts provide pantry staples, fresh produce, hygiene and toiletry products, and a needed refrigerator.

Maverick Pantry — Continuing to provide its services to food-insecure individuals is the reason the Maverick Food Pantry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha has launched a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/unomavfoodpantry with the goal to raise $5,000. Meeting the goal will enable it to help students through the end of the year, which often represents difficult months for some students.

UNMC Global Center for Health Security — The Global Center for Health Security, led by the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine, represents a tradition of biopreparedness, including the internationally acclaimed Nebraska Biocontainment Unit team. A gift supports the center’s rapid response abilities, including training, education, research and clinical expertise for infectious diseases.

Nebraska Medicine — Support for patient and employee safety through personal protective equipment is the reason Nebraska Medicine has a special crowdfunding campaign at nufoundation.org/nemedppe. Gifts of various levels can help make certain health care professionals always have face masks, infectious disease supplies, face shields and intubation shields.

Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund — Helping current employees who face financial hardship resulting from emergency or crisis situations, such as the current health pandemic, is why support for the Nebraska Medicine Employee Emergency Assistance Fund is important now.

Those who are interested in supporting the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Medicine in other ways can explore the options at nufoundation.org/covid19.

Two students at the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture (NCTA) in Curtis are wrapping up their spring semester of college, thanks in part to scholarship support from ag producers in Lancaster County.

Emmaly Wright of Lincoln is finishing an equine industry management major, while Chris Reynolds of Lincoln is a veterinary technology student.

Both students are recent recipients of scholarships provided by Lancaster County Farm Bureau through a gift to the University of Nebraska Foundation.

Members of Lancaster County Farm Bureau encourage students to pursue careers in agriculture, animal health and related industries, said Burdette Piening, whose family farms near Lincoln.
Piening is chair of the county scholarship committee, which provides scholarship support to ag students at NCTA, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and three community colleges.

“We believe in agriculture, education and the young people entering Nebraska’s workforce,” Piening said.

Wright and Reynolds were awarded their $1,000 scholarships through NCTA’s financial aid office. Scholarship recipients do not need to be members of Farm Bureau but must have graduated from a high school in Lancaster County.

Wright, a 2016 graduate of Lincoln East High School, has a summer internship working at an equine facility before finishing her studies in August.

Wright’s career goal is to work at a horse training or boarding facility. She showed horses through Lancaster County 4-H, worked at an area stable during high school and then took her horse, Lucky, along to Curtis. Classes in nutrition and feeding, reproduction, disease prevention and treatment, training and riding horses, and facilities management have her well prepared for her career.

Reynolds, a Lincoln Southwest High School graduate, is back home in Lincoln during the coronavirus pandemic, taking veterinary technology courses remotely. He plans to return to Curtis for summer session in mid-June.

Reynolds said he’s always been interested in taking care of animals and seeks a job in a veterinary clinic or zoo. Currently his courses include parasitology, radiology, nursing and exotics.

Last updated April 1, 2020

This is information about how the University of Nebraska Foundation is responding to the COVID-19 public health crisis as we continue our commitment to serving the University of Nebraska and its valued stakeholders.

Given the challenges our state, country and world face now, the foundation remains more committed than ever to our extremely relevant mission to grow relationships and resources that enable the University of Nebraska to change lives and save lives.

How you can help during this uncertain time

We are in uncharted territory.

A national emergency declaration in response to a pandemic virus is new to all of us, and we want to be both sensitive and responsive to the unique situation of every student,  alumnus and friend of the University of Nebraska.

With economic uncertainty a reality for many, we ask for financial support with prudence. At the same time, some in our university family have reached out to ask how they can help, and some student support organizations have reached out for assistance.

Here are opportunities that allow you to help our students, patients, world-leading research and communities during this public health crisis.

From all of us at the foundation, our thoughts are with those around the world who are affected by the coronavirus and the challenges it brings. We encourage you to please take precautions to be safe, and, as always, thank you for all that you do for the University of Nebraska.

How we continue our operations

Our top priority is the health, safety and well-being of our team members, supporters, alumni and friends.

While most foundation employees have been directed to work remotely, our offices — located in Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha — remain open.

As we continue to receive and acknowledge all gifts made through the mail or online here at nufoundation.org, our commitment to our mission has become more important than ever.

For the safety of all involved, the foundation has suspended all travel by our team members outside Nebraska and has canceled or postponed gatherings and events, including those held in partnership with the University of Nebraska. In addition, meetings and direct interactions with donors, alumni, university personnel or other stakeholders will be held via video or phone or postponed to a later date.

The NU Foundation is monitoring the latest public health advisements and following updates from the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, local health departments and our own experts at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine. We will continue to closely monitor the situation and evaluate additional measures as needs arise.

Each campus — UNL, UNMC, UNO and UNK — has information available for students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends to help navigate this situation as best as possible. We’re especially proud of the important role that the University of Nebraska Medical Center and its clinical partner, Nebraska Medicine, are taking in the battle against the coronavirus.

The University of Nebraska continues to be an information resource for the news media, including Esquire, CNN, Time, The New York Times, CBS “60 Minutes,” News Channel Nebraska and others.

“We are a team, and in times like this, teams rally,” said Brian Hastings, president and CEO. “I have every confidence that we will come through this situation as a stronger organization and with an even greater commitment and appreciation for our mission.”

Here for you

We remain available to help and serve you. If you need information or assistance, please use any of these ways to reach us:

University of Nebraska at Kearney alumnus Dr. Alan L. Smith feels he was never able to fully participate in his college experience. While studying at UNK, then called Kearney State College, he was juggling a job while concentrating on his studies in biology and plant science during the early 1960s.

To assist future generations of UNK students and enable them to participate more fully in all the university has to offer, Smith and his wife, Irene Smith, have established a permanently endowed scholarship fund at the University of Nebraska Foundation.

The Alan and Irene Smith Biology and Plant Science Endowed Scholarship Fund will provide two annual scholarships to students studying in the Department of Biology within the College of Arts and Sciences. Scholarships will be awarded by the department’s scholarship committee to juniors or seniors majoring in biology who have an interest in plant science.

“Endowing this scholarship gives us the opportunity to not only give back to the college—which gave me a start—but to provide opportunities to students from smaller schools in Nebraska,” Alan Smith said. “Technology in the plant sciences continues to grow, so there should be opportunities for well trained and educated graduates. Hopefully, this scholarship will give selected students the opportunity to contribute to their field.”

The Smiths, who reside in Fredericksburg, Texas, near Austin, created the scholarship to especially aid graduates of the Southwest Public Schools in Bartley, Nebraska, who meet the scholarship’s award qualifications. Students who graduated from other rural areas of Nebraska may also be considered if qualified candidates are not identified who attended the Southwest Public Schools system.

Dr. Julie Shaffer, chair of UNK’s Department of Biology, said scholarships geared toward students from rural areas of the state are especially valuable to UNK because the campus is known for providing rich opportunities to rural and first-generation students. She said scholarships such as the one created by the Smiths make it so financial hardships don’t stop students from being successful.

“In the sciences and the biology department, students need that support to meet their goals,” Shaffer said. “Our rural students are interested in pursuing career paths in plants and agriculture; this scholarship will help them do that.”

The first Alan and Irene Smith Biology and Plant Science Endowed Scholarship will be awarded this spring for the 2020-2021 school year. In future years, the scholarship fund will provide two scholarship awards annually.

As a native of Bartley, Nebraska, Alan Smith hopes the scholarship fund will help many students from rural areas flourish through the years. Though he had to work hard to put himself through UNK, he said he is fond of his time on campus and the education he received.

“I cannot say enough about the quality of science education I received at UNK,” Smith said. “The breadth of science coursework required to get a degree in biology laid the foundation for my advanced degrees. It also gave me the tools to attack problems encountered during my professional career. The courses were taught by professors who were engaged in educating young people.”

Alan Smith graduated from UNK in 1964 and then received a master’s degree at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and a doctorate in plant ecology at Texas A&M University. Now retired, he enjoyed a successful career as an environmental consultant and was owner of Global Environments located in Houston, Texas, for 20 years. Alan and Irene Smith are graduates of the Bartley High School class of 1959.

For months, the effects of COVID-19 have stretched across our campus, our city, our state and our world. The pandemic has affected the health of thousands of Nebraskans and has financially impacted many, many more. It is a difficult time for us all, but the crisis has created especially adverse hardships for many students and employees of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Many of you have asked how you might offer some assistance. For those of you who are able to make a gift in this time of crisis, the University of Nebraska has three funds that will help. Whether you’re able to give or not, we hope you and your family remain safe and healthy.

You may contribute online to any of these fund causes below or call the University of Nebraska Foundation at 800-432-3216.

University of Nebraska Emergency Assistance Fund
Created to support students and employees on all four campuses of the University of Nebraska who face sudden financial hardship that makes it difficult to purchase groceries, pay rent, and cover other monthly expenses.

UNL Student Hardship Fund
A fund dedicated to the students of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln who are experiencing financial difficulties due to a crisis, including the current COVID-19 pandemic.

UNL Food Pantry Fund
The Husker Pantry provides basic food items and other daily necessities like toothbrushes, feminine hygiene products, deodorant, shampoo, and toilet paper to UNL students at no cost.

Explore other ways to support the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Thank you for your contribution of any amount to help at this time.